Sunday, May 7, 2017

Barn # 2




I have finished up my special project, but need to reorganize and set up for my regular stitching functions.  We are in a very cold, extremely rainy, and horribly windy weather pattern right now.  BUT - I ducked out inbetween storm fronts to grab some photos of the next barn.  You've seen this one a lot as it sits across from my porch.   

This Grand gal has quite a history!



"The Schoharie Valley originally was settled by Palatine German immigrants in 1712, and was considered the frontier of colonial New York for much of the eighteenth century. The area became the seat of bloody conflict between Loyalist and Patriot neighbors during the American Revolution, and much of the rich agricultural region was devastated by the war. Upon conclusion of hostilities, the area that would become Schoharie County was made a part of Albany County (1788), governed from Albany without local representation. Seeking to remedy this situation, local citizens submitted numerous petitions requesting that a separate government be established for the Schoharie region. Acceding to these requests, the New York State legislature passed an act formally establishing the County of Schoharie effective June 1, 1795. The first meeting of the county's judges, justices and supervisors was held December 16, 1795.  The first court sessions of the new county were held in the Ingold wagon barn located south of the present village of Schoharie."     resource *  LivingPlaces


From a horse/carriage barn to a court house.  I'm sure she had other 'lives', but I knew her as the Lumber Mill for many years.  We had three different size lumber planes in this Gal and ran timber thru her for many years - for the farm itself and for other companies.


The North end with the door for pulling 'milled' boards out and onto waiting trucks.  Again the thick base which you can see is telling age and wear.


Full of those wonderful huge hand-hawned post and beams.  I didn't go upstairs - those old ladder step types, but I do remember the old jail cells up there as a kid.  The have since been removed and I don't remember which museum they reside in now. 


A few of the planing belts are all that is left of this part of the girl's past life.  She's been used to house parties, garage sales - but really just another storage barn.  You may have caught glimpses of other barns around her and I will share them next time.


Sewingly Yours,
Sharon  

11 comments:

  1. Thanks, Sharon for sharing the rich and varied history of this beautiful barn. The things her timbers have seen for 200+ years....wow. I am loving this journey.

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  2. those huge sliding doors, and inside, lots of stories hidden in the aged wooden beams and floor. Old barns are so special.

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  3. A court house with jail cells, lumber mill; that barn's earned her living over the years. Thanks for telling us about her.

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  4. WOW!! What a fabulous building and a great history!! A court house!!!! So cool!!

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  5. so cool to know the history of her. she certainly worked all her life

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  6. So much amazing history right there in your yard, does the county do anything to maintain that barn? Do you have tour buses showing up?

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  7. Fascinating bits of history, Sharon. Thanks for sharing.

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  8. Beautiful barn with so much history. If walls could talk .....

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  9. What wonderful history on your farm. Cool!

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  10. What a fantastic history!! Such amazing stories your barns have!

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